The Many Ways to Photograph the Louvre | Photography Unfolded

The Many Ways to Photograph the Louvre

 In Locations, Tips + Tricks

We’re pretty excited to be taking our workshop group to Paris with us this fall! We thought it would be fun to feature some of the great locations we’ll be photographing, so let’s talk about the iconic Louvre.

While we won’t be exploring the museum in the usual touristy, art-going sense we will be photographing it extensively. A great area to focus on is the pyramid designed by I.M. Pei and how it interacts with the historic architecture of the museum. In this first shot, you see how fun it can be to play with reflections. It was a pretty dull, gray day so filling the frame and focusing on the contrast between old and new eliminated that boring sky.

louvre, paris

A bit of a wider shot which includes both the old and new, while also incorporating people to add a sense of scale. Here, that dull sky works well to create some negative space.

louvre, paris

There are also a number of ways to play with symmetry between the various styles of architecture. There’s also a good amount of layering within each frame.

louvre, paris

louvre, paris

After exploring the exterior of this space we’ll be heading inside just under the pyramid. Another great area to play with the modern vs. historic styles of architecture. It’s also hard not to spend hours photographing this staircase! You can use the various architectural elements to create layers…

louvre, paris

..or focus on the details…

louvre, paris

louvre, paris

…or use the staircase as a framing element.

louvre, paris

Another area we’ll explore is the La Pyramide Inversée.

La Pyramide Inversée

As I mentioned, we won’t be exploring this massive museum entirely. But if you’re in Paris and find yourself spending the day, or week here (seriously, this place is so big you could spend a week in here! lol), here are a few other ideas on how to see this space.

Relatively close to the staircase under the pyramid are these stone, arching walls which make for fun abstracts in playing with light and shadow.

louvre, paris

From the higher floors you can get some great views of the Eiffel Tower.

louvre, paris

Using foreground elements, like this statue, set you up to create a layering effect in this wider shot.

louvre, paris

This modern staircase was a favorite area to photograph.

louvre, paris

And these archways and windows are just pretty, again, another space to utilize symmetry and layering.

louvre, paris

If you find yourself back here in the evening here are a few options.

louvre, paris

The last two are playing with motion blur during the longer exposures. From semi-abstract to fully abstract.

louvre, paris

louvre, paris

We still have a few spots open for the Paris workshop, September 27-30, 2018. Beyond the Louvre, we have so many amazing locations planned – modern & historic, cityscapes & abstracts. It’s going to be a fantastic 4 days in this beloved city. Check out all the details here. We’d love to have you join us!

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