2018 New York Workshop Recap Day 3&4

 In Workshop Recaps

Last week, we shared images from days 1 & 2 of our New York workshop. It’s time to follow with days 3 & 4!

Day 3 – The High Line

The goal for our third day was to spend most of our time on the high line, taking in the beautiful architecture that keeps being built around the urban park. We started at the northern end, where the Hudson Yards (Kohn Pedersen Fox; Diller Scofidio + Renfro; Skidmore, Owings and Merrill; Elkus Manfredi Architects; Heatherwick Studio) are being built. Unfortunately, most of the site is under construction, and it was really rainy, so we mostly photographed the lobby of 10 Hudson Yards.

After a stop at a coffee shop to wait for the rain to stop, we headed south on the High Line. Our second stop was 515 W 29th St (SCDA Architects), a condominium building with a wavy facade. One of our attendees went back on a sunny day and told us that the fins look so much better on a cloudy day.

Our next stop was 520 W 28th St (Zaha Hadid Architects) and it’s rugged metal cladding. Not the easiest to photograph, but some details are interesting.

Further south, there are a couple of interesting buildings: 245 10th Avenue (Goshow Architects, Della Valle-Bernheimer) and High Line 23 (Neil M. Denari Architects).

We then got off the High Line towards 11th avenue, where two starchitects-designed buildings are next to each other: Jean Nouvel’s 100 11th Avenue and Frank Gehry’s IAC Building.

100 11th Ave has an interesting structure over its entrance. Michael let the sky blow out as it was all gray and didn’t bring anything to the image.

The IAC building is usually white but the glass took a blue hue with the overcast sky. We then took a bus towards 41 Cooper Square (Morphosis). We first stopped by 51 Astor Place (Maki & Associates), a building with an interesting geometry and different types of glass producing different reflections.

41 Cooper Square, a Cooper Union building, has a mesh curtain over most of the building. It’s a good combination of grids and curves. After an early dinner, we headed to New Jersey and J. Owen Grundy Park for a view of the skyline. Unfortunately, by then the fog was so dense that we could barely see Manhattan and there wasn’t much to photograph!

Day 4 – The Financial District

We started our last day a dawn at the Brooklyn Bridge Park. Fortunately, by then the fog has started to lift and provided a nice mood to the blue hour images.

The sky stayed gray after sunrise so Michael went for a black and white version of the skyline:

We made our way to the Brooklyn Bridge, stopping by Washington St for one of the iconic views of the Manhattan Bridge.

As we walked on the Brooklyn Bridge towards Lower Manhattan, the sky stayed very moody:

After breakfast, we stopped at 8 Spruce Street (Frank Gehry) and its curved metal facade. A telephoto is a must to photograph this building! We then had arranged a private tour of the Woolworth Building, one of the older iconic buildings of the financial district. The lobby itself is worth the visit!Our next stop was the Fulton Center (Grimshaw Architects). The atrium is stuning and offers many opportunites to shoot abstracts. The elevator tower has some nice reflections! Our final stop of the workshop was the World Trade Center and its many buildings: 4 WTC (Maki & Associates), 3 WTC (Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners), 1 WTC (Skidmore, Owings and Merrill), the 9/11 Memorial (Snøhetta), the 9/11 Museum (Davis Brody Bond) and the Oculus (Santiago Calatrava).

The group photographed all buildings, but we spent most of our time at the Oculus. The sun decided to make an appearance for the last hour of the workshop!


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